10 things we know about Star Wars: Visions (so far)

Almost 45 years have passed since Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope created, but the Star Wars franchise continues to expand into several types of media: movies, video games, novels, comics and, of course, television. One of the more recent additions to this universe is Star Wars: Visions.

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Star Wars: Visions is an anime anthology that presents the interpretation of several anime studios on the Star Wars universe without necessarily adding to the central story of the saga. According to the creators, the idea behind the series is to celebrate the Star Wars galaxy using the “new and diverse cultural perspective” of some of the best anime creators in the world.

ten It’s a series of animated anthologies


Star Wars: Visions is an animated series produced by Lucasfilm Animation, the animation division of Lucasfilm. The show – currently airing on Disney + – is an anthology series that builds on the lore of the Star Wars franchise with nine original stories created by different animation studios.

While all nine episodes can fit organically into the Star Wars timeline, their plot is unrelated to any of the franchise’s previous movies or TV series. The show’s producers had the creative freedom to create outside of the franchise canon as long as they stayed true to the identity of the Star Wars saga.

9 There are seven anime production companies involved


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In order to ensure the quality of the series, Lucasfilm has contacted seven of the best Japanese animation studios currently available. These included Kamikaze Douga, Studio Colorido, Geno Studio, Kinema Citrus, Production IG, Science SARU, and Studio Trigger. The latter two created two episodes each.

Science SARU is also known for its work with the anime Devilman crybaby and for “Food Chain,” which is the seventh episode of the sixth season of Adventure time. Studio Trigger’s productions include Kill the kill, the Little Witches Academy anime, and his two original films: Little Witches Academy and Little Witch Academia: The Enchanted Parade.


8 It includes a Filmmaker Focus edition for each episode


Star Wars Visions 1

In addition to the nine animated short films that make up Star Wars: Visions, Disney + includes a series of featurettes that allow audiences to take a behind-the-scenes look at each of the short films. These special episodes include exclusive interviews with the cast and crew of Star Wars: Visions, and they offer a new perspective on the making of the show.

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For example, “Tatooine Rhapsody” (a fan favorite) includes an interview with the director of the short film, Taku Kimura, who explains his ideas behind his episode. This featurette also includes an interview with Joseph Gordon-Levitt, who voices one of the characters in the story.


seven The series features several famous actors


lucy liu and joseph gordon-levitt

the new one Star Wars: Visions the episodes feature famous actors and seiyū as the voices of their characters. Whether in Japanese – her native language – or dubbing in English, fans will encounter several familiar voices in the series if they pay attention.

Renowned celebrities like Lucy Liu, Neil Patrick Harris and Karen Fukuhara – among many others – are voicing some of the Star Wars: Visions characters in English, while famous seiyū like Asami Seto, Kenichi Ogata and Wataru Takagi lend their voices for the original Japanese audio.


6 Stories add nothing to the central story


The Ninth Jedi fights in Star Wars Visions

From Ewoks at The Mandalorian, Star Wars: Visions is far from the first Star Wars TV series, but it is the franchise’s first anime. However, this does not add anything to the continuity of the films. In fact, none of the episodes feature characters from the films as protagonists like the other series do.

Star Wars: Visions’ The main objective is to offer a new perspective on the Star Wars universe using the “anime’s single lens”. For this reason, the chosen movie studios were given creative freedom as long as they remained inspired by the Star Wars franchise. Their stories are not part of the central story, but a glimpse into the Star Wars universe.


5 The series features talented musicians


Use six lightsabers in Star Wars Visions

As Colorido Studio’s Taku Kimura said in one of his interviews, music is a key part of the Star Wars universe, and Star Wars: Visions is no exception to this rule. The score for the series was created by 8 different musicians full of talent and fresh ideas for the franchise.

Two prime examples of these gifted composers are Kevin Penkin and Keiji Inai. While Penkin is known for his work in Crafted in the Abyss and Eden, Inai’s work can be found in Epidemic company, Tokyo crows, and Chronicles of the White Knight, the video game. the Star Wars: Visions The full soundtrack was released digitally in October 2021 and can be found on platforms such as Spotify.


4 One of the episodes was nominated for an Annie Award


Duel with the lightsaber in Star Wars: anime visions

Star Wars: Visions was widely acclaimed by audiences when it premiered, but even among its excellent episodes there are a few favorites. “The Duel” – the first episode of the series – was particularly appreciated by many for its combination of Japanese lore with the identity of the Star Wars franchise.

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“The Duel” tells the story of Ronin – a mysterious wanderer who protects a feudal Japanese village from a self-proclaimed black Sith lord. This short film won a nomination for Best Mainstream Animated Television Production at the 49th Annie Awards, which are accolades that recognize excellence in animation.




3 The show comes with two linked multimedia pieces


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While Star Wars: Visions is already a thrilling and interesting expansion of the Star Wars universe, the nine shorts that make up the show also come with two different media works that provide fans with even more material about the show.

The first is Ronin: a novel of visions, which is an original book by Emma Mieko Candon who based her work on the first episode of the series, “The Duel”. The second link is an art book that will be published by Dark Horse Comics in June 2022. The book will feature interviews with key artists from Star Wars: Visions, as well as selected works of art created especially for the nine short films.


2 Some have compared the series to the Studio Ghibli production


The intrinsic relationship between the natural world and its spirituality has always been a central topic in anime, but Studio Ghibli is known to delve deeper into this relationship. In this sense, Hayao Miyazaki’s work constantly combines good character and respect for the environment. While the heroes respect and protect nature, the bad guys try to destroy it.

Star Wars: Visions adopts this philosophy. Most episodes in the series portray the beauty of the natural world, and some even go so far as to explicitly discuss its importance, such as “The Village Bride”, which describes the Force as an entity directly connected to the planet. .


1 There is no news on a second season yet.


Nothing has been said about a second season for Star Wars: Visions. However, according to the producers, whether the show gets a second season or not is entirely up to the audience. James Waugh said Reverse “There is nothing planned”, but they are willing to continue working on the show as long as the audience loves it.

Of course, the show was a hit among Star Wars fans. Additionally, some of the shorts include characters whose stories could certainly be expanded upon, whether on Star Wars: Visions or in another show. This means that there is hope for new material.

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