Libertarianism – Freedom Toons http://freedomtoons.org/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 03:03:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://freedomtoons.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Libertarianism – Freedom Toons http://freedomtoons.org/ 32 32 Ezell knocks down Palazzo, Guest fends off Cassidy in Mississippi runoff https://freedomtoons.org/ezell-knocks-down-palazzo-guest-fends-off-cassidy-in-mississippi-runoff/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 02:55:47 +0000 https://freedomtoons.org/ezell-knocks-down-palazzo-guest-fends-off-cassidy-in-mississippi-runoff/ U.S. Representative Steven Palazzo, representing Mississippi’s 4th District, became the first incumbent congressman to lose a party primary in the state’s recent history when he was defeated by the county sheriff on Tuesday. Jackson, Mike Ezell, during the second round of the Republican primaries. Another incumbent Congressman, Michael Guest of the 3rd District in central […]]]>

U.S. Representative Steven Palazzo, representing Mississippi’s 4th District, became the first incumbent congressman to lose a party primary in the state’s recent history when he was defeated by the county sheriff on Tuesday. Jackson, Mike Ezell, during the second round of the Republican primaries.

Another incumbent Congressman, Michael Guest of the 3rd District in central Mississippi, easily survived a run-off challenge from former Navy pilot Michael Cassidy in the Republican primary.

In West Mississippi’s runoff on Tuesday, Brian Flowers defeated Ronald Eller and will run in the November election against incumbent Democrat Bennie Thompson, the only African-American member of the United States House.

Incumbents Guest and Palazzo were forced to run for office because neither got a majority vote in the first primary earlier this month.

Guest, a former district attorney representing Madison and Rankin counties in suburban Jackson, actually trailed campaign novice Cassidy in the first primary vote.

But in the runoff, the Republican establishment and the Guest campaign, which had apparently underestimated Cassidy, campaigned hard, easily outpacing Cassidy. Late Tuesday, with results still in, Guest had a 67% to 33% lead over Cassidy.

Palazzo did not have similar success in the second round. In the late results, Ezell had a 54% to 46% lead over the incumbent.

The Associated Press called both races Tuesday night.

Ezell in his campaign had hit out at Palazzo over a longstanding complaint the 12-year-old incumbent has faced: that he is inaccessible to voters and often absent from the district or Congress. Palazzo was also the subject of a House ethics investigation into allegations that he used campaign and congressional funds for personal expenses.

In 2010, Palazzo was a member of the State House representing Harrison County when he was a surprise candidate against Democratic incumbent Gene Taylor. Most gave Palazzo little chance of upsetting longtime incumbent Taylor, considered a fixture in Gulf Coast politics.

But Palazzo took advantage of the historic Republican wave of 2010 to upset Taylor.

Palazzo’s loss appears to be the first time an incumbent U.S. House member has lost a party primary in Mississippi since 1962. That year, incumbent Jamie Whitten beat fellow incumbent Frank Smith in the Democratic primary after being placed in the same district after Mississippi lost. a seat in the House.

In the 3rd District, Cassidy presented himself as a Donald Trump conservative, but Guest attacked his conservative managers in campaign-ending ads. Cassidy, a Lauderdale County resident, had touted various social spending programs, such as a proposal for universal health care, on his campaign webpage. Cassidy then quit those programs, but not before giving fodder to the Guest campaign.

Cassidy attacked Guest for being a “Republican in name only” and for voting for the proposed Jan. 6 commission to investigate the attacks on the U.S. Capitol. Trump opposed the commission.

In the general election in November, Guest will face Democrat Shuwaski Young. Ezell will face Democrat Johnny DuPree and Libertarian Alden Johnson.

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Clerk’s Office Completes Solicitation Process to Certify and Finalize 2022 Los Alamos County Primary Election Results https://freedomtoons.org/clerks-office-completes-solicitation-process-to-certify-and-finalize-2022-los-alamos-county-primary-election-results/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 18:47:40 +0000 https://freedomtoons.org/clerks-office-completes-solicitation-process-to-certify-and-finalize-2022-los-alamos-county-primary-election-results/ Solicit attendees from left to right, Board Member James Rickman, Deputy Chief Clerk Adrianna Ortiz, Board Member Heath Davis standing, Board Member Betty Ann Gunther and Board Member Cameron Counters. Photo taken by County Clerk Naomi Maestas County News: The Los Alamos County Clerk’s Office has completed the solicitation process required to certify and finalize […]]]>

Solicit attendees from left to right, Board Member James Rickman, Deputy Chief Clerk Adrianna Ortiz, Board Member Heath Davis standing, Board Member Betty Ann Gunther and Board Member Cameron Counters. Photo taken by County Clerk Naomi Maestas

County News:

The Los Alamos County Clerk’s Office has completed the solicitation process required to certify and finalize the results for the 2022 primary election, which was held on Tuesday, June 7, 2022.

The canvassing committee met at 1 p.m. on Monday, June 13 in the municipal building. The canvassing board consisted of Cameron Counters (Democrat), Betty Ann Gunther (Democrat), Heath Davis (Libertarian), and James Rickman (Democrat). Board member Jolyn McTeigue (Republican) was not present.

County Clerk Naomi Maestas, Acting Chief Electoral Officer Victoria Martinez and Deputy Chief Clerk Adrianna Ortiz also attended. An audience member, Kimberly Thomas, watched.

During the process, the Canvassing Board verified the accuracy of election results at early and absentee polling locations, as well as polling centers on election day. The results solicited turned out to be an accurate match between the tapes and the results posted on Election Day.

The canvassing board also reviewed the accuracy of the information on the hand-tabulated and written ballots. The canvassing board then issued a canvassing certificate, which was sent to the New Mexico Secretary of State and others, as required by law. The results then go through another investigation at the state level and then a third review by an independent auditor.

The canvassing certificate and the official election results are available on the County Clerk Web page.

“It was a pleasure to serve with the members of the Board of Directors who are dedicated to ensuring the integrity of elections in Los Alamos County,” Rickman said. Asked about the process, Rickman said. “Through the painstaking efforts of the Los Alamos County Clerk and her staff, as well as everyone who worked on the polls, the board was able to effectively drill down into the details of the elections that we felt were important to further examine. detail and to have all of our questions answered. At the end of this experience, I can confidently say to anyone that I have the utmost confidence that Los Alamos County once again held a free and fair election, the cornerstone of a flourishing democracy.

The final ballot count in the 2022 primary election totaled 3,301, a 30% turnout among Los Alamos County’s 11,035 eligible registered voters. Of a total of 3,301 votes, 1,744 were cast in early voting, 203 were cast by mail and 1,354 were cast on election day.

New Mexico’s ability to register and vote on the same day allowed 117 voters – 39 during early voting and 78 on Election Day – to participate and have their voices heard by becoming a new voter or changing their party affiliation.

“Although this election was not as robust as previous elections, I would like to note and appreciate the 3,301 voters who participated in this recent election in one way or another and made an effort to make their voices heard. their voice,” Clerk Maestas said.

Clerk Maestas would like to thank all of the candidates for their dedication and commitment throughout this electoral process. Many thanks to UNM-Los Alamos and the Betty Ehart Senior Center – as well as the League of Women Voters of Los Alamos, partners in promoting voter registration and sharing key election information .

Clerk Maestas would like extend a special “Thanks” to all the electoral agents who have spent many hours, from May 10 during the late hours of Election Day, serve voters in a friendly, professional and efficient manner.

“I would like to express my sincere gratitude to the election workers, who are true patriots for their bravery and dedication to the electoral process!” said Clerk Maestas. “We are all extremely lucky for their service!”

Clerk Maestas also wishes to express her most sincere gratitude to the many county department employees who all contributed to the success of the election. Special thanks to all of the Clerk’s staff: Acting Elections Manager Victoria Martinez; Deputy Chief Registrar Adrianna Ortiz; Principal Deputy Registrar Victoria Montoya; Deputy Clerks Anna Archuleta, Ubaldo Barela, McKenzie Vaupel and Allison Collins; and student secretary Katelyn Alarid.

Clerk Maestas would also like to remind residents who registered by mail, online or with the motor vehicle department after May 10 that they will start processing entries when the books reopen on July 12. Those who are not registered or who have moved can obtain a voter registration application outside the County Clerk’s Office at 1000 Central Ave., 2nd Floor, Suite 240. Services and Registration Forms voters are also available through the Department of Motor Vehicles or online for newly eligible. Mexican citizens through the New Mexico Secretary of State website.

For more information, visit the Registrar’s website or contact the office at 505.662.8010 or by email at clerks@lacnm.us Where elections@lacnm.us.

Follow the Los Alamos County Clerk’s Office on Facebook + instagram + Twitter.

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Walker, Warnock and Oliver run for U.S. Senate https://freedomtoons.org/walker-warnock-and-oliver-run-for-u-s-senate/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 10:00:42 +0000 https://freedomtoons.org/walker-warnock-and-oliver-run-for-u-s-senate/ One of Georgia’s US Senate seats is up for election again. Both candidates – incumbent Raphael Warnock and challenger Herschel Walker – won their primaries hands down. Another candidate, libertarian Chase Oliver, also qualified for the November 8 general election. Headquarters Warnock was elected in 2021 in a special election to fill the term of […]]]>

One of Georgia’s US Senate seats is up for election again. Both candidates – incumbent Raphael Warnock and challenger Herschel Walker – won their primaries hands down. Another candidate, libertarian Chase Oliver, also qualified for the November 8 general election.

Headquarters

Warnock was elected in 2021 in a special election to fill the term of the late Senator Johnny Isakson, who retired due to health issues. He defeated Republican Kelly Loeffler, who was nominated by Gov. Brian Kemp to fill Isakson’s seat ahead of the special election.

Isakson had served two full terms, but with mounting medical issues, he retired at the end of 2019 with two years remaining in his term. Because Isakson’s term had not ended, Warnock served only briefly in office before running for re-election to a full six-year term.

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Tillman wins Democratic runoff for Alabama House District 56 against Huffman https://freedomtoons.org/tillman-wins-democratic-runoff-for-alabama-house-district-56-against-huffman/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 05:35:13 +0000 https://freedomtoons.org/tillman-wins-democratic-runoff-for-alabama-house-district-56-against-huffman/ Bessemer’s attorney, Ontario Tillman, won a strong runoff victory in the Alabama House District 56 election on Tuesday against Tereshia Huffman, a resident of Oxmoor Valley and a member of the Birmingham Water Works Board. Tillman received 1,903 votes (71%), compared to 766 votes (29%) for Huffman, according to unofficial vote totals from the Alabama […]]]>

Bessemer’s attorney, Ontario Tillman, won a strong runoff victory in the Alabama House District 56 election on Tuesday against Tereshia Huffman, a resident of Oxmoor Valley and a member of the Birmingham Water Works Board.

Tillman received 1,903 votes (71%), compared to 766 votes (29%) for Huffman, according to unofficial vote totals from the Alabama Secretary of State’s office. He will now face libertarian Carson Lester in the November 8 general election. No qualified Republicans to run for the seat.

Tillman won 12 of 14 polling places in the district on Tuesday, which includes Ross Bridge and part of the Lake Cyrus community in Hoover, as well as most of the communities in Bessemer, Brighton, Lipscomb and Oxmoor Valley and Shannon.

Huffman scored victories in the Ross Bridge and Oxmoor Valley polls, according to numbers provided by the Tillman campaign, but his numbers weren’t strong enough to overcome Tillman’s dominance in the rest of the district.

Tillman celebrated his victory with his supporters Tuesday night at E’s Legacy Smart Venue in downtown Bessemer and thanked them for their votes, prayers and words of encouragement.

“It’s not about me. I’m running as a public servant … to make changes in District 56,” Tillman said. “It is the victory of the people. … I think it came down to the fact that the 56-year-old people believed in me and I believed in the people and I wanted to represent the people – the people that I’ve known all my life growing up and being part of this community.

Tillman said he thinks voters are looking for someone who knows the district, understands the community, and will be active and approachable.

During the campaign, voters told him they wanted him to take care of things like infrastructure, floods, crime and jobs, he said. But the first thing he wants to do if he wins the general election is to learn how everything works in the Legislative Assembly and get to know the other members of the Legislative Assembly.

“It’s like being a rookie in the NFL. You have to learn the game, especially at this level,” Tillman said. “I want to make sure I know the process well so I can be the best and most effective representative I can be.”

During his campaign, Tillman said he would work to create more good-paying jobs in the House 56 district so people can earn a living wage. He will also work to provide more adequate and affordable housing, push for the expansion of mental health services, improve the public transport system, roads and other infrastructure, increase teachers’ salaries and retired teachers and to focus on science, technology, engineering and math education, he says.

Jeremy Ervin, his campaign manager, said when Tillman first announced he was running for the Legislative Assembly, many people counted him out.

“They didn’t even consider him a viable candidate to even run because he was new to politics,” Ervin said. “But one thing I knew was the support he had here.”

Tillman was the top vote-getter in the May 24 Democratic primary, with 2,090 votes (42 percent), to Huffman’s 1,198 votes (24 percent). The other two candidates who did not make the run-off were Bessemer councilor Jesse Matthews with 1,010 votes (20%) and former Bessemer councilor Cleo King with 712 votes (14%).

Tillman’s victory in the Democratic primary was “a thing of God,” Ervin said. “When it’s your time, it’s your time. God does not call people who are qualified. He qualifies those who are called.

Tillman said his opponents had had good campaigns and thanked them for making themselves available for service.

Huffman congratulated Tillman on his win and said he had a great campaign. She also thanked the people who supported her campaign and the issues she stands for.

“I gave my all to this campaign,” she said. “I didn’t get the result I wanted, but I’m not giving up on the district.”

She still wants to stand apart from people on issues like mental health, equitable education and inclusive economic development, she said.

Alabama House District 56 is currently represented by Louise Alexander, but she gave up the seat to run for Alabama House District 19 and ended up losing that candidacy on May 24 to Merika Coleman.

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Poll: Lujan Grisham with narrow lead at start of general election https://freedomtoons.org/poll-lujan-grisham-with-narrow-lead-at-start-of-general-election/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 06:05:00 +0000 https://freedomtoons.org/poll-lujan-grisham-with-narrow-lead-at-start-of-general-election/ A new survey commissioned by NM Policy Report shows incumbent Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham holding a narrow lead over Republican candidate Mark Ronchetti at the start of the general election campaign. Public Policy Polling shows Lujan Grisham leading Ronchetti 45% to 42%, with libertarian Karen Bedonie receiving 9% and 5% saying they are unsure. Lujan […]]]>

A new survey commissioned by NM Policy Report shows incumbent Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham holding a narrow lead over Republican candidate Mark Ronchetti at the start of the general election campaign.

Public Policy Polling shows Lujan Grisham leading Ronchetti 45% to 42%, with libertarian Karen Bedonie receiving 9% and 5% saying they are unsure.

Lujan Grisham’s lead is within the poll’s margin of error.

Lujan Grisham won the 2018 gubernatorial campaign with 57.2% to 42.8% against Steve Pearce, the Republican nominee and now chairman of the New Mexico Republican Party.

Ronchetti lost the 2020 US Senate election to Democrat Ben Ray Luján by 51.7% to 45.6%, with Libertarian Bob Walsh taking 2.6%.

Bedonie lost in the 2020 Republican 3rd congressional district primary.

Ronchetti, a former meteorologist, easily won a five-way Republican primary earlier this month, while Lujan Grisham was unopposed. Bedonie had a registered opponent.

Lujan Grisham holds a large lead among those who voted for Biden in 2020, 86% to 6%, with 4% saying they would vote for Bedonie. Ronchetti, meanwhile, leads among Trump voters 88% to 8% for Bedonie and 1% for Lujan Grisham.

Lujan Grisham’s lead also comes largely thanks to Hispanic or Latino voters, 64% of whom would vote for the incumbent, compared to 28% for Ronchetti and 3% for Bedonie. Ronchetti, meanwhile, leads among white voters with 54% choosing him, compared to 32% for Lujan Grisham and 11% for Bedonie. Among other ethnicities, 45% support Lujan Grisham, 26% support Ronchetti and 16% support Bedonie.

The poll of 642 New Mexico voters was conducted June 13-14. Public Policy Polling called landlines and texted those who didn’t have one. The poll has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.9% for the main questions, while the sub-populations will have larger margins of error. Not all percentages add up to 100% due to rounding.

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State party convention delegates will choose candidates for statewide positions https://freedomtoons.org/state-party-convention-delegates-will-choose-candidates-for-statewide-positions/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 03:51:35 +0000 https://freedomtoons.org/state-party-convention-delegates-will-choose-candidates-for-statewide-positions/ Republican and Democratic nominees for Secretary of State, State Auditor, and State Treasurer are chosen by delegates at state party conventions. Lauren Chapman/IPB News Delegates to the Indiana Republican Party convention this weekend have two contested races to vote. Candidates for the positions of Secretary of State, State Treasurer, and State Auditor will be […]]]>

Republican and Democratic nominees for Secretary of State, State Auditor, and State Treasurer are chosen by delegates at state party conventions.  - Lauren Chapman/IPB News

Republican and Democratic nominees for Secretary of State, State Auditor, and State Treasurer are chosen by delegates at state party conventions.

Lauren Chapman/IPB News

Delegates to the Indiana Republican Party convention this weekend have two contested races to vote.

Candidates for the positions of Secretary of State, State Treasurer, and State Auditor will be formally chosen at the two major state party conventions.

Current state treasurer Kelly Mitchell has a limited term, leaving an open race to replace her. There are four Republicans vying to do so: Morgan County Republican Party Leader Daniel Elliott, former George W. Bush administration spokesman Pete Seat, Fort Wayne City Clerk Lana Keesling, and Boone County Council President Elise Nieshalla.

Secretary of State Holli Sullivan is technically the incumbent — but she was named to the position last year and has drawn three opponents to the GOP convention: former libertarian Paul Hager, former Mike Pence aide Diego Morales and Knox County Clerk David Shelton.



Join the conversation and sign up for the Indiana Two-Way. Text “Indiana” to 73224. Your comments and questions in response to our weekly text message help us find the answers you need on statewide issues.

This race has become something of a referendum on Governor Eric Holcomb and the so-called Republican “establishment” in Indiana. Those who strongly opposed Holcomb and particularly his decisions during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic sought to link Sullivan to the Republican governor.

Incumbent Republican State Auditor Tera Klutz is unopposed at the convention.

Democrats have no contested races. They have already identified their candidates who will be officially named at the convention. Destiny Wells is running for Secretary of State, ZeNai Brooks for Auditor and Jessica McClellan for Treasurer.


Contact reporter Brandon at bsmith@ipbs.org or follow him on Twitter at @brandonjsmith5.

Copyright 2022 IPB News. To learn more, visit IPB News.


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Immunity protects North Carolina school leaders accused of ignoring abuse https://freedomtoons.org/immunity-protects-north-carolina-school-leaders-accused-of-ignoring-abuse/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 14:07:41 +0000 https://freedomtoons.org/immunity-protects-north-carolina-school-leaders-accused-of-ignoring-abuse/ Placeholder while loading article actions A special education teacher in Statesville, North Carolina, repeatedly pushed an autistic first-grade student into a trash can, telling him that if he ‘acted like trash,’ he would be treated ‘like trash,’ according to a federal trial; she pushed him to the ground and covered his nose and mouth. The […]]]>
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A special education teacher in Statesville, North Carolina, repeatedly pushed an autistic first-grade student into a trash can, telling him that if he ‘acted like trash,’ he would be treated ‘like trash,’ according to a federal trial; she pushed him to the ground and covered his nose and mouth. The abuse was reported to superiors, according to the lawsuit, but nothing was done, and the following year she forced the child to stand all day and poured grease on her head.

Robin Johnson continued to teach and abuse students until an outside therapist made a report to police, the lawsuit in federal court said. Johnson pleaded guilty to assault; the boy’s mother later sued school administrators, saying her son was still suffering psychologically from the experience.

On Tuesday, the United States Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit ruled that these officials were shielded from liability because there were no substantiated allegations that they had acted maliciously, corruptly or outside of their duties. official.

“The mere allegation that such disheartening things happened at their school does not show that school officials intended let them happen,” Judge J. Harvie Wilkinson wrote for a unanimous three-judge panel. While the malice “has a certain intuitive appeal here given the troubling facts alleged,” he wrote, the plaintiff did not actually make that claim or present any evidence in his complaint.

The legal principle of “qualified immunity” that protects police officers from civil suits has drawn widespread anger in recent years, but the doctrine has survived in state legislatures and the US Supreme Court. Less publicized is the immunity enjoyed by other government actors involved in the case filed in 2020 against leaders of the Iredell-Statesville school district in North Carolina.

North Carolina’s law is ‘better than most states’ because only state officials, not regular state employees, have immunity, said Anya Bidwell, who leads the Immunity Project and accountability at the Institute for Justice, a libertarian public interest law firm. But, she said, “it’s a perfect example of state immunity and how difficult it is to overcome.”

Federal immunity is even broader; Last week, the United States Supreme Court ruled that a Border Patrol agent could not be prosecuted for retaliation or excessive use of force after he was accused of pushing an innkeeper to the ground.

The plaintiffs in the North Carolina case unsuccessfully argued that malice can be inferred by “knowledge of the abuse, lack of investigation, and reckless disregard for the abuse “.

An employee reported the alleged abuse to the manager, who told district employees; no school employee notified the police, social services, the state superintendent, or the child’s mother, and the student remained in Johnson’s class for second grade.

Because his ability to communicate is limited, the boy was only able to tell his mother about some of the abuse when it had been going on for two years, according to the lawsuit. When her mother confronted school officials, she said, they stood up for Johnson. It wasn’t until he was in third grade, at another school, that a therapist learned of the abuse and reported Johnson to the police, according to the court filing.

Even after pleading guilty to assaulting a disabled person, she was listed online as a teacher in the district, according to the plaintiffs.

There is a duty to investigate and report student abuse under North Carolina law, and a lower court agreed with plaintiffs that immunity does not apply because there was no no discretionary power.

But the appeals court said the decision on how to handle that requirement is discretionary, and that even if it isn’t, it’s unclear whether Carolina’s immunity law North excludes mandatory bonds.

“Public officials can be negligent; officials can even be recklessly indifferent,” said Sarah Saint, representing council members, during oral arguments in March. “That’s what public immunity in North Carolina is for.”

Johnson did not appeal the district court’s finding that the lawsuits against her could proceed, and claims that the council violated federal law protecting persons with disabilities survive. But the ability to collect damages that would help pay the child’s therapy bills is now limited.

“So what’s the cure when you’re going to have counseling for a long time, probably for life, because of what happened – because of what was knowingly allowed to happen to you?” his attorney, Stacey Gahagan, asked in an interview.

Judge Diana Motz, in a concurring opinion, suggested the district court dismiss the claims without prejudice so the family could file a new lawsuit alleging malice. Gahagan said she hoped she could. Lawyers for school officials did not respond to a request for comment.

Motz noted that formal immunity, particularly for police officers, has “come in for heavy criticism,” including from Supreme Court justices. But she said it was up to state lawmakers to respond: “North Carolina has not yet chosen to reconsider its doctrine of public official immunity. Unless and until that day arrives, we may only apply immunity as required by law.

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Push for dress code tattoo bans to be included in Queensland’s anti-discrimination law https://freedomtoons.org/push-for-dress-code-tattoo-bans-to-be-included-in-queenslands-anti-discrimination-law/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 20:22:25 +0000 https://freedomtoons.org/push-for-dress-code-tattoo-bans-to-be-included-in-queenslands-anti-discrimination-law/ A Queensland businessman wants anti-discrimination laws changed to stop pubs, clubs and restaurants from barring people with face and neck tattoos. Key points: The Queensland Human Rights Commission is currently reviewing the state’s anti-discrimination law Civil liberties advocates, tattoo artists and people with tattoos are pushing for laws to include dress codes prohibiting people with […]]]>

A Queensland businessman wants anti-discrimination laws changed to stop pubs, clubs and restaurants from barring people with face and neck tattoos.

His push has won backing from civil libertarians and tattoo artists, with lawyers saying owners of venues with discriminatory dress codes are already breaking existing human rights laws – but the issue has yet to be tested in front of the public. courts.

Daniel Lowry, 34, has a large rose tattoo on his neck and other visible body art.

“I’m a young Australian, I’m a business owner, I’m a musician,” he said.

Mr Lowry has been refused entry to restaurants because of his tattoos.(ABC News: Michael Lloyd)

Over the years he has been refused entry to venues on the Gold Coast and Brisbane – including a family birthday dinner at The Blackbird in Brisbane’s Eagle St Pier and the popular Burleigh Pavilion when he visited Burleigh Heads on his honeymoon.

“Moments like that are very frustrating because the reasoning makes absolutely no sense to me. I should be able to dine out with my family.”

Submission to change laws

As the Queensland Human Rights Commission is currently reviewing the state’s anti-discrimination law, Mr Lowry has filed a petition with lawmakers asking them to make anti-tattoo dress codes illegal.

At the moment, they are not covered by Queensland’s Anti-Discrimination Act, written 30 years ago.

A report will be delivered to the attorney general next month detailing proposed changes to the laws after submissions on a wide range of issues.

A tattooed man walks his dog down a suburban street
Mr Lowry says he feels like he is lumped in with ‘extremists’ and ‘criminals’ because of his body art.(ABC News: Michael Lloyd)

According to Mr Lowry, he called for tattoos to be classified as “physical characteristics” and “bodily characteristics” which cannot be discriminated against.

“The subtext of what they’re saying is that you belong to a group, and there are criminals or extremists in that group, and we’re going to kick you all out because of that.”

Tattoo artists want change

Gold Coast tattoo artist Tim Ebbles, owner of Borderline Tattoos in Burleigh Heads for more than two decades, said many customers with visible tattoos no longer go out to pubs and clubs because they know they would not enter.

“I think tattooed people are very persecuted or watched,” he said.

A man stands behind art in a tattoo shop
Mr Ebbles says many customers with tattoos on their faces and necks no longer go to approved venues.(ABC News: Alexandria Utting)

“Everyone should be allowed to go wherever they want and have a beer, relax and have fun.”

Tattoo artist Jayden Moles says many people use body art to mark important events or remember loved ones.

“There are people who have good jobs and are well covered in tattoos, say, from wrist to toe, but at the same time they are not well seen either.

“It’s 2022, we’re in the new era. Everyone has tattoos, unfortunately.”

Freedom of expression protected

Queensland Council for Civil Liberties (QCCL) Deputy Chairman Terry O’Gorman believed that although there are no protective provisions in the state’s anti-discrimination law, the Human Rights Act of Rights in Queensland protected “freedom of expression, including through art”.

“There’s a wide range of people in the community who have tattoos. I’ve met a number of police officers, including police prosecutors, trades and people from all walks of life…and a number growing number of women.”

A man in a pink shirt with a red tie sits at a desk looking at papers and into the camera
Mr O’Gorman says the Queensland Council for Civil Liberties will write to the relevant authorities about the dress code practice.(ABC News: Marton Dobras)

He said dress codes that sought to ban customers with certain tattoos were sticking to “old-fashioned” views, and QCCL should write to the Office of Alcohol and Gaming Regulation (OLGR ) to draw attention to what he described as “completely illegal”. practice”.

Mr O’Gorman said the dress codes were reminiscent of hardline laws introduced as part of the Newman government’s controversial crackdown on biker gangs.

“Some authorized premises permit holders were supported by the police to prevent people with tattoos from entering because they were suspected of being associated with bikers,” he said.

Right to choose owners of places

Glen Day is a member of the Queensland Council of the Restaurant and Catering Industry Association of Australia.

The Gold Coast businessman said restaurants, clubs and pubs should have the right to enforce dress codes.

“They have to make that decision themselves and they should have the right to do so,” Mr Day said.

A man stands in front of a pancakes in paradise sign
Gold Coast restaurant owner Mr Day says business owners have the right to choose who enters.(ABC News: Alexandria Utting)

The restaurateur said he doesn’t have a no-tattoos dress code in his restaurants because they are family-friendly establishments, but high-end restaurants often ban face tattoos and neck for good reasons.

“Not everyone who has tattoos is a violent person,” he said.

“But there are some who look very aggressive with their tattoos and they do it on purpose.

“You can pick them from a mile away, usually they have some sort of chip on their shoulder and they want to be a big person and you can see that.

Job , updated

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Weak turnout for independents in New Mexico primaries | Local News https://freedomtoons.org/weak-turnout-for-independents-in-new-mexico-primaries-local-news/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 04:30:00 +0000 https://freedomtoons.org/weak-turnout-for-independents-in-new-mexico-primaries-local-news/ Country the United States of AmericaUS Virgin IslandsU.S. Minor Outlying IslandsCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth ofCuba, Republic ofDominican RepublicHaiti, Republic ofJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist Republic ofAlgeria, People’s Democratic Republic ofAmerican SamoaAndorra, Principality ofAngola, Republic ofAnguillaAntarctica (the territory south of 60 degrees S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, Republic ofAzerbaijan, Republic ofBahrain, Kingdom ofBangladesh, People’s Republic […]]]>

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Is DeSantis a principled governor or a retaliatory culture warrior? https://freedomtoons.org/is-desantis-a-principled-governor-or-a-retaliatory-culture-warrior/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 21:07:09 +0000 https://freedomtoons.org/is-desantis-a-principled-governor-or-a-retaliatory-culture-warrior/ In this week Raison round tableeditors Matt Welch, Peter Suderman, Katherine Mangu Wardand Nick Gillespie examine Florida Governor Ron DeSantis’ style of conservatism and discuss President Joe Biden’s upcoming visit to the House of Saud. 1:28: DeSantis and his approach to governance 30:36: Weekly question from listeners: You sometimes talk about the Libertarian Party, and […]]]>

In this week Raison round tableeditors Matt Welch, Peter Suderman, Katherine Mangu Wardand Nick Gillespie examine Florida Governor Ron DeSantis’ style of conservatism and discuss President Joe Biden’s upcoming visit to the House of Saud.

1:28: DeSantis and his approach to governance

30:36: Weekly question from listeners: You sometimes talk about the Libertarian Party, and you may be aware of the recent convention which saw power go to a faction that many describe as quite alienating. This led many traditional libertarians to leave the party altogether. My question for all of you is: do you think the Libertarian Party is necessary to facilitate more libertarian representation in politics? If not, how do you see libertarian ideals developing in the traditional duopoly?

38:39: Biden’s next visit to Saudi Arabia

52:30 p.m.: Media recommendations for the week

This week’s links:

The death of Walt Disney’s Private Dream City? by Zach Weissmueller and Danielle Thompson

Anti-LGBT panics are bad for everyone’s freedom“, by Scott Shackford

Blame Biden for high gas prices“, by Nick Gillespie and Regan Taylor

Saudi prince’s plan for ‘walkable’ city of single-file buildings could instead be two-mile-long skyscrapers“, by Christian Britschgi

Alex Epstein: Why the Future Needs More Fossil Fuels“, by Nick Gillespie

Send your questions to tableronde@reason.com. Be sure to include your social media ID and the correct pronunciation of your name.

Sponsor of the day:

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  • Reason Speakeasy: Nick Gillespie and Brian Doherty talk about “Dirty Pictures”

Audio production by Ian Keyser

Production Assistant by Hunt Beaty

Music: “Angeline”, by The Steve brothers


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