Libertarianism – Freedom Toons http://freedomtoons.org/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 04:23:44 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://freedomtoons.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Libertarianism – Freedom Toons http://freedomtoons.org/ 32 32 The Battle for ‘Based’ – The Spectator World https://freedomtoons.org/the-battle-for-based-the-spectator-world/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 04:23:44 +0000 https://freedomtoons.org/the-battle-for-based-the-spectator-world/ Earlier this week, two libertarian right-wing journalists announced the launch of their new site, BASEDPolitics. All hell broke loose quickly on right-wing Twitter. In the first editorial for their new site, co-founders Brad Polumbo and Hannah Cox define “based” as “direct, on point, or rooted in true principles.” That pretty much fits my understanding of […]]]>

Earlier this week, two libertarian right-wing journalists announced the launch of their new site, BASEDPolitics. All hell broke loose quickly on right-wing Twitter.

In the first editorial for their new site, co-founders Brad Polumbo and Hannah Cox define “based” as “direct, on point, or rooted in true principles.” That pretty much fits my understanding of the term, but it leaves out something.

This “something” explains the repel they received from the post-liberal national conservative crowd. According to them, libertarians like Polumbo and Cox are nothing more than Koch-funded accomplices fighting for tax cuts and weaker antitrust laws while drag queens read to our children. They are not “based” and do not have the right to designate themselves as such.

‘Our culture is not your suit’, popular right-wing Twitter personality joked. Sohrab Ahmari, a American Conservative editor-in-chief who advocates “political Catholicism”, tweeted “I’ll never use ‘based’ again, now that these corporate morons are making it their own.”

Ahmari also added derogatory remarks comments about Polumbo’s “gigantic” head and Cox’s “overflowing cleavage” as they appeared in the ad graphic.

I asked Polumbo (full disclosure: he and I are both affiliated with Young Voices) if he expected that kind of reaction. Here is what he had to say:

Oh yes, we were expecting a pushback from the very online nationalist crowd. I don’t particularly mind that, even though some of them have been ad-hominem and juvenile, and that’s pretty pathetic, fan behavior. We will not stoop to that. But repression is somehow the goal. Nationalists want to redefine what it means to be a conservative so that it resembles Elizabeth Warren’s big government economics and social conservative more than Ronald Reagan. We still believe that the future of the right should be rooted in free markets, individual liberty, the Constitution, [and] limited government.

The term “based” originated in the black community as slang for being raised on crack. Perhaps there is a connection with “freebasing” or smoking cocaine. From there, the definition of the term expanded to cover all the odd and erratic behavior commonly associated with “crackheads”. A modern equivalent might be to say that someone “stumbles” or “tweaks”. This does not necessarily mean that the person is under the influence of psychedelics or methamphetamine, only that they act like it. “You’re crazy,” pronounced either with total disdain or with a hint of admiration, would have the same meaning.

“Based” began to take on its current connotation with rapper Lil B the Based God, who released his debut album, boys based, in 2007. According to Lil B, “Based means being yourself. Don’t be afraid of what people think of you. Don’t be afraid to do what you want to do.

According to an online dictionary, the term, now a “signal of power and bluster”, was associated with online law in the 2010s as a synonym for “politically incorrect”. Donald Trump was “based” because he was willing to say things that pissed off the libs and then laugh at their outrage.

“Can you believe OrangeMan said X?!” yells the indignant soycuck. “Lol, based,” the gigachad replies.

It seems to me that at this point, an earlier definition of “based” unrelated to West Coast drug culture began to influence the New Right’s use of the term. “Based” retained its sense of Trump’s manic, unconscious Twitter energy, but it also took on the meaning of being “based on” or “based on” something older and more solid than the endless stream of liquid modernity. Eric Zemmour is based. Viktor Orban too. Jailing pornographers, seizing Ford Foundation assets, and going to Latin mass with your nine kids and your trad wife are all based. In the darker corners of right-wing Twitter, Rhodesia, Mussolini and overt expressions of sexism are also “based”.

The mainstream definition of “based” is somewhere near the intersection of troll and trad.

Polumbo told me that he is fully aware that he is going against the usual meaning of the term: “Although it is not our only mission, a crucial part of our project is to explicitly combat the conservative nationalist movement in a substantive and idea-based way. We’re redefining what it means to be ‘based’ whether they like it or not. Freedom is founded. Catholic integralism and other forms of light theocracy are authoritarian and un-American.

The post-liberal answer, of course, would be that right-libertarianism, like progressivism, is a dominant ideology masquerading as disjointed resistance. They are two sides of the same beast called liberalism. They share the world: freedom in the meeting room and freedom in the bedroom.

I am not at all the libertarian that Polumbo is, but I am not yet a totally convinced post-liberal either. I think awakening is a much bigger threat than socialism. At the same time, I fear that any type of post-liberal political project will lead to tyranny. The levels of social conservatism and, frankly, religiosity it demands simply don’t have enough traction to win national elections.

Imagine the average Joe Rogan listener. Not the far-right white nationalist behemoth sketched out in think piece after think piece, but the representative of America’s median, “barstool conservative.” He is economically agnostic, an admirer of entrepreneurship who distrusts big business. Socially, he is slightly left of center. The idea of ​​giving kids puberty blockers freaks him out, but he has no interest in banning gay marriage or no-fault divorce. He would be more likely than Polumbo to support trade protectionism and smash big tech, but Ahmari would struggle to sell him on porn bans and blue laws.

Polumbo and Cox bet that this electoral bloc will be more open to Friedrich Hayek than to Thomas Aquinas. Their plan seems to be to overthrow capitalism while presenting the awakening as a collectivist distortion of individual freedom rather than its natural extension. It is possible, they promise, to combat the excesses of progressivism — to be “grounded” — without rejecting many of the fundamental assumptions of American politics and culture.

It can work. If their attempt to recapture the “base” is successful, we will know that it is.

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Nikki Fried Brings Personalized Message to Florida TaxWatch, Shares Stage with GOP Firebrands https://freedomtoons.org/nikki-fried-brings-personalized-message-to-florida-taxwatch-shares-stage-with-gop-firebrands/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 09:47:26 +0000 https://freedomtoons.org/nikki-fried-brings-personalized-message-to-florida-taxwatch-shares-stage-with-gop-firebrands/ Agriculture Commissioner Nikki fried – a Democratic candidate for governor of Florida – faced a decidedly skeptical (and mostly Republican) crowd on Wednesday night. Florida TaxWatch supporters gathered in Tallahassee for the annual Taxpayer State Dinner, a noisy rally where cheers erupted whenever a speaker congratulated the outgoing president. Ron DeSantis as the “greatest governor […]]]>

Agriculture Commissioner Nikki fried – a Democratic candidate for governor of Florida – faced a decidedly skeptical (and mostly Republican) crowd on Wednesday night.

Florida TaxWatch supporters gathered in Tallahassee for the annual Taxpayer State Dinner, a noisy rally where cheers erupted whenever a speaker congratulated the outgoing president. Ron DeSantis as the “greatest governor in America”.

Fried, who is contesting DeSantis’ re-election, has emerged as the only Democrat elected to the program. She has done her best to brag about her accomplishments during a single tenure with the Florida firm in terms of business success. She helped usher in the birth of the Florida hemp industry, marketed local crops through Florida Fees, and raised the Citrus Industry, an agricultural institution that gives Florida a myriad of tasty identities: from orange on state license plates to name the stages after the citrus legends.

And whatever political beef she rides on the election campaign, she has promised TaxWatch supporters to welcome the contribution of budget watchdogs.

“Ensuring that government is efficient and fiscally responsible is a sacred responsibility of every elected official,” Fried said.

Of course, during the meeting, his post served as an outlier in many ways. For the most part, the elected officials who take the stage promise above all freedom; low taxes came next.

Palm Bay Republican Randy good delivered a familiar critique of “government-run schools,” praising DeSantis for evisceration of the common trunk and criticizing the federal government for sending money for education at the time of the pandemic “to reopen schools that were already open”.

As the executives of Florida TaxWatch promised surveillance On the injection of $ 8.8 billion of federal money into the state budget this year, Fine suggested that even the watchdogs had underestimated how much had arrived. Back to the start of the pandemic, including funding from the Republican Donald trump administration and democrats Joe biden administration, well over $ 15 billion had come for schools alone.

While Fried said the state should be grateful to Biden for his continued leadership on funding, most lawmakers seemed to wince at the arrival of the money. Fine said the government would fire him, except that would only mean that the revenues went to blue states like New York and California.

Senator Jason Brodeur, a Republican from Lake Mary, said he fought for years against the mindset of spending dollars primarily on areas of weak leadership.

“Who gets the most funding? The communities that need it most, ”he said. “Why are they in need? They have been the most irresponsible with their funding.

But he also expressed optimism about the government’s role in modernizing Florida if it can show leadership and look past the “parade of horrors” that predict only negative outcomes.

Most lawmakers have shouted at DeSantis, praising individual decisions and saying it has built a reputation in Florida as a state that puts freedom first.

representing Stan mcclain, a Republican from Ocala, recounted a visit to Texas, where locals told him, “You have the greatest governor; can you share it with us as chairman? McLain recalled. “I said ‘Not yet.'”

But lawmakers also said there were challenges for the state to overcome.

Senator Jeffrey Brandes, a Republican from Pinellas, praised Florida reopenings and a libertarian response to the pandemic, even as he devoted much of his time criticizing state prisons. His focus on the government’s shortcomings was presented through a conservative budget lens. He explained how prison overcrowding left a reserve of inmates in county jails, enough to fill two state jails if there was room. He also lamented the litigation environment in Florida, which suffered 8% of natural disasters in the United States but produced 80% of insurance claim litigation.

“We have things we need to talk about and challenges we need to face,” he said.


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By Lee Feinstein: Hope Debate in High School | https://freedomtoons.org/by-lee-feinstein-hope-debate-in-high-school/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 15:57:00 +0000 https://freedomtoons.org/by-lee-feinstein-hope-debate-in-high-school/ I recently found myself on the phone with a former senior official whose political background, personal and generational history could not be more different from mine. However, we found ourselves in a strong agreement as the former official said: “For the first time in my life, I am worried about the future of our democracy. […]]]>

I recently found myself on the phone with a former senior official whose political background, personal and generational history could not be more different from mine. However, we found ourselves in a strong agreement as the former official said: “For the first time in my life, I am worried about the future of our democracy. It is the well-intentioned sentiment that brought the Conservatives and Liberals together in a series of open letters on the “need to unite in defense of liberal democracy”.

Glad that I am participating in such private demonstrations of solidarity and seeing published statements signed by people representing different political views, none of this gives me much optimism. The global democratic recession has turned into a global undemocratic wave. To hope, I look elsewhere: at a suburban high school in central Indiana, as one of several dozen amateur judges in one of the first in-person debate tournaments since the lockdown.

Student debaters are instructed to adhere to a judicious mask mandate: wear them when you’re not eating. Take them out, if you like, when it’s your turn to debate. The students and their parents react without shrugging their shoulders. No complaints. No indignation studied. Just an agreement to follow a reasonable request to keep everyone safe.

Debaters arrive at 8 a.m. from large and medium-sized cities, and suburbs and small towns, across the state. The teachers and coaches are a relaxed and interactive group: white, black and brown, just like their students. Some of the debaters have been in the Midwest for many years. Others are more recent arrivals in the United States. The state calls itself the crossroads of the country. Dare to think of it not as a land of flyover, but as the third American coast.

In the debate rooms, young people compete. For students and debate judges, racial and gender differences are insignificant and insignificant.

It’s not that students don’t have different points of view. If you listen carefully, you can detect political tendencies towards conservatism, left-wing activism, libertarianism, and mainstream politics. Students are assigned to a camp and are prepared to argue both for and against the stipulated resolution; if so: Resolved: A just society should recognize an unconditional right to strike.

The students finely slice the syntactic salami. A debater defends the position assigned to him, arguing that reckless actions by strikers would not be allowed if so.

Another ‘Aff’ debater defends the value criterion she has chosen of ‘utilitarianism’. Measures to “equalize power,” she said, would benefit most people the most. Another argues that the gigantism of companies makes the recognition of a fundamental right to strike imperative now.

Debaters back up their arguments one way or the other with historical cases. COVID-19 has been used as an argument for and against recognizing the right of healthcare workers to organize.

Some students have brought global perspectives to the debate: Unconditional recognition of the right to strike is needed to protect workers in countries where the minimum wage is even lower than in the United States, says one debater. She cites Egypt and Iran as examples… Her opponent claims that granting an unconditional right to strike discourages work and is impractical for the world’s poor.

Students adopt competing values ​​and value standards. Their values ​​are “justice” or “personal safety”. Their “value criteria” range from Locke’s social contract to Kant’s ideas on “human dignity”, to the principles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

At the end of the debate, the students put aside any emotion that may have accumulated during the cross-examinations and rebuttals, with: “Good debate” or “Good job”, shaking the imposed certainties of their debate roles, and the world around it. them.

Resolved: The future of democracy in this country is decided in places like this central Indiana high school, which challenges stereotypes of the Midwest in its ethnic and gender diversity, in rejection of political polarization, and in the joint effort of its students and teachers to navigate the world as best they can in this precarious time.

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Germany assesses reliability of antibody tests for Omicron – Minister | The powerful 790 KFGO https://freedomtoons.org/germany-assesses-reliability-of-antibody-tests-for-omicron-minister-the-powerful-790-kfgo/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 18:53:46 +0000 https://freedomtoons.org/germany-assesses-reliability-of-antibody-tests-for-omicron-minister-the-powerful-790-kfgo/ FRANKFURT (Reuters) – Germany will study the reliability of rapid antigenic tests to detect the rapidly spreading Omicron variant of COVID-19, Health Minister Karl Lauterbach said on Sunday. “We don’t know exactly how well these tests work for Omicron,” Lauterbach told public broadcaster ARD, adding that the results of the assessment would be available in […]]]>

FRANKFURT (Reuters) – Germany will study the reliability of rapid antigenic tests to detect the rapidly spreading Omicron variant of COVID-19, Health Minister Karl Lauterbach said on Sunday.

“We don’t know exactly how well these tests work for Omicron,” Lauterbach told public broadcaster ARD, adding that the results of the assessment would be available in the coming weeks.

It was clear, however, that “the alternative of not testing at all … would be far too dangerous,” said Lauterbach, scientist and physician.

Earlier, he told a Sunday newspaper that Germany needed to revamp its COVID-19 vaccination strategy to tackle the Omicron variant and ensure it can quickly develop a new vaccine if it is faced with a variant of coronavirus that is more deadly in the future. New measures for dining and drinking were only introduced last Friday.

Omicron now accounts for 44% of coronavirus infections in Germany, said the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) for Infectious Diseases.

On Sunday, RKI recorded 36,552 newly reported corona infections within 24 hours, three times the number a week earlier.

The lower house of parliament in the Bundestag will soon discuss a bill for a general immunization mandate that is supported by business and the public sector, but has been delayed due to uncertainty over united support within the tripartite coalition government.

Lauterbach, of the Social Democratic Party, strongly advocates compulsory vaccinations and Justice Minister Marco Buschmann of the libertarian FDP in an interview with the Sunday newspaper Bild am Sonntag also urged parliament to vote on the matter quickly.

However, the parliamentary leader of the Green Party, Britta Hasselmann, said in an interview with the Funke media group that parties should first discuss the issue internally.

“It is not an easy decision, it involves deep intervention,” she said.

(Report by Alexander Ratz and Vera Eckert, edited by Susan Fenton)


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Congress, States and Local Candidates Run for the May Primary | Politics https://freedomtoons.org/congress-states-and-local-candidates-run-for-the-may-primary-politics/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 23:33:00 +0000 https://freedomtoons.org/congress-states-and-local-candidates-run-for-the-may-primary-politics/ Photo by Pexels. INDIANAPOLIS — Those seeking positions in the US Congress, state legislature and local offices began applying for the May primary election with the Secretary of State’s office this week. Hundreds of candidates filed Wednesday, the first day of the process. Holder Frank Mrvan, D-Indiana, applied for District 5. The seat of the […]]]>









INDIANAPOLIS — Those seeking positions in the US Congress, state legislature and local offices began applying for the May primary election with the Secretary of State’s office this week. Hundreds of candidates filed Wednesday, the first day of the process.

Holder Frank Mrvan, D-Indiana, applied for District 5.

The seat of the Indiana District 46 Senate is up for grabs. The neighborhood, which was created during last year’s redistribution, stretches south to the University of Indianapolis area and east past Warren Park. So far, four candidates have applied, all Democrats.

Ashley Eason is a bipartisan activist for local nonprofit organizations in the Midwest. She is from Texas but has lived in Tennessee and Washington, DC. Its platform is focused on job creation.

Karia Lopez Owens is not a politician. She comes from a family of working class immigrants. The four principles of his vision are community, affordability, sustainability and accessibility.

Andrea Hunley is the principal of an Indianapolis public school. Its priority is to ensure that education policy has a positive impact on local communities.

Kristin jones is a county municipal councilor, representing the 16th district of the council. His candidacy was approved by several unions in the Midwest.

Reneé Pack D-Indianapolis, filed for District 92 (incumbent).

Nan Polk (Democrat) applied for District 54.

Ross Thomas (Democrat) applied for District 59.

The Secretary of State is one of the few state offices that will not appear on the primary ballot. The candidates for this post, as well as the lieutenant governor, state auditor, state treasurer and attorney general, are decided at party conventions.

Destiny Wells (Democrat) is a lawyer and combat veteran. She is currently the Vice President of Coalitions and Expansion of the Indiana Democratic Party, but previously served as Deputy Attorney General of Indiana as well as an attorney with the Associate Corporation Counsel of the City of Indianapolis and the Marion County.

Wells grew up in Martinsville. She then attended Indiana University and graduated from the Texas School of Law.

If elected, Wells plans to oppose restrictive election laws, according to a press release announcing her candidacy.

Holli Sullivan (Republican) is the current Secretary of State. Governor Eric Holcomb appointed her to the post in March 2021 when Connie Lawson stepped down. The change occurred while Sullivan was representative for District 78 (Evansville and Newburgh).

During her term in the legislature, Sullivan co-authored a 20-year infrastructure bill and served as chair of the Bipartisan House Women’s Caucus.

Prior to politics, Sullivan worked as a supervisor in the paint division of General Motors. She then founded Onward Consulting, a business consulting firm in Evansville. She now lives in Evansville with her husband, Chad, and their three children.

Kyle Conrad (Republican) is a longtime Newton County resident with electoral and administrative expertise. He worked for Governmental Business Systems, a company that facilitates programming, testing, training and certification of voting systems.

Conrad has a strong presence in local politics. He served as Newton County Circuit Court clerk for 10 years and is now in his third term as Newton County Commissioner, first elected in 2012. He has also served as Newton County Republican President for 17 years and fire chief since 1999.

Diego Morales (Republican) served as Assistant in the Office of the Secretary of State and in the Office of the Lieutenant Governor. He was also a senior advisor to former Vice President Mike Pence when he was governor of Indiana.

Morales competed in the 2018 Indiana District 4 Congressional Race.

Morales has an international orientation. He received his BA from Indiana University and an MA from Tilburg University in International Business Administration (NED). A multilingual hoosier, he is native English and Spanish speakers, and is also fluent in Portuguese, Italian, Hungarian and a Mayan dialect.

He served in the US Army at one base in Georgia and two bases in Indiana (Cass and Floyd counties). He received the Sagamore of the Wabash Award from Indiana and was also named Kentucky Colonel. Both distinctions are awarded to honor significant public contributions.

Jeff Mauer (Libertarian) announced his candidacy in August 2021. He has worked in technology, transportation and finance.

Mauer is a resident of Carmel and a member of the town’s Economic Development Commission and Home Place Advisory Board. He promises on his website that he will restore integrity and confidence in the vote and believes a smaller government will be more efficient.

Mauer will vie for selection to run for the Indiana Libertarian Convention in March.

Isaac Gleitz is a reporter for TheStatehouseFile.com, a news site powered by journalism students at Franklin College.



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Progressivism and Bitcoin are not opposed https://freedomtoons.org/progressivism-and-bitcoin-are-not-opposed/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 00:30:00 +0000 https://freedomtoons.org/progressivism-and-bitcoin-are-not-opposed/ While people often see the two as being at different ends of the political spectrum, Bitcoin is actually non-political technology designed to help everyone. It is time to set the record straight. Too many who write or pontificate about Bitcoin don’t know what progressivism means in the political realm of US politics – looking at […]]]>

While people often see the two as being at different ends of the political spectrum, Bitcoin is actually non-political technology designed to help everyone.

It is time to set the record straight. Too many who write or pontificate about Bitcoin don’t know what progressivism means in the political realm of US politics – looking at you Daniel Kuhn. In reality, many ideas among progressives and the left are fully aligned with Bitcoin’s mission.

“Progressive” is in fact an umbrella term which groups together many left-wing political ideologies under a set of demands that we consider be inalienable rights of every human being. These are education, health, a living wage and housing. It is true that progressives call on the government to protect and maintain these supposedly inalienable rights. However, do not believe that progressives and the left are defenders of the state simply because they demand better of it.

In practice, progressives do their best when they are not focusing on electoral politics. At the local level, progressives focus on self-help, unions and grassroots organization. These stem from the revolutionary anarchist tradition that arose out of the horrific working conditions during the first centuries of capitalism.

The goal of the revolutionary anarchist of the 19th century was the absolute dissolution of the state by any means necessary. Anarchists despised the state with a passion that surpassed anything Murray Rothbard could have expressed. The anarchists of the day engaged in guerrilla warfare and many died trying to destroy the state (Rothbard comfortably lived his life under the state, I might add). Progressives may not be trying to blow up the state these days, but their focus is on helping communities without government help.

Many assume that since Bitcoin inherently protects the right to property and individual ownership, it must be ideologically opposed to the beliefs of progressives. In fact, progressives are not averse to owning things, in general. It is about rent, interests and democratic enterprises. What progressives really want are savings without rent.

In fact, if you go back to classic 19th century economic discussions of a free market, this is what people like Adam Smith, John Stuart Mill, Karl Marx, Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, David Ricardo and others were trying to figure out. . Thus, owning bitcoin is not in opposition to progressivism. Progressives are not inherently opposed to money, but simply to the way it is used as a means of control and power. Progressives and Bitcoiners oppose neoliberalism because, among other problems it has created, neoliberalism is supported by state violence.

As for the sole individual ownership of Bitcoin, this is just a misunderstanding of Bitcoin. Bitcoiners are very proud of El Zonte, El Salvador’s Bitcoin Beach experience. It is hailed as a model for a successful circular economy based on Bitcoin. Here, the developers of the Bitcoin Beach wallet realized that residents would benefit from a community custody option. In this case, the wallet makes it possible to designate a trusted member of the community as the holder of the private keys of the wallets of others. Here, responsibility is now associated with community trust, not individual responsibility.

The idea of ​​individual responsibility is unique to the West and even more so to the United States. Community identity is much more important in other parts of the world. Given that Bitcoin has performed so well in many developing countries where community is valued more than individuality, it’s hard to believe that Bitcoin is really only for those concerned with strict individualism.

Another interesting community-owned idea in Bitcoin is the federated currency (FediMint). Here, a community with some confidence among its members, can effectively co-own the Mint. This leads to a whole set of new ideas on community currencies backed by Bitcoin, which remind me a little of Paul Grignon’s ideas on self-issued credit but also the concept of Prodhoun’s popular bank, both coupled with the work of John. Nash. on the ideal money. There is so much here that progressives like!

The only real part of Bitcoin that seems ideologically opposed to progressives at the moment is the 21 million bitcoin cap. The main reason is that there are economic leaders in the movement who are followers of John Maynard Keynes. This probably stems from the Keynesian critique of neoclassical economics and the argument that markets do not tend towards full employment, among others.

Part of the desire for post-Keynesian approaches may be nostalgia for this long limited era of capitalism in the postwar period. In part, this is a seemingly pragmatic approach to smoothing out boom and bust cycles, in which Keynes argued that deficit spending should occur during economic crises and be limited during surpluses. Hyman Minsky, another mainstay of economics for progressives, attempted to unite Joseph Schumpeter (Austrian school) and Keynes to figure out how to stabilize an unstable economy. By the way, this unification (written in the early 1980s) provided a prophetic prediction of the Great Recession.

Even though there seems to be a contradiction here between Keynesian ideas and Bitcoin’s monetary policy, some of the more progressive economists, like Michael Hudson and Steve Keen, appear regularly in Max Keiser’s “The Keizer Report” for their scathing critiques of the banking system, dollar hegemony, quantitative easing and neoclassical economics. Are you surprised? Progressive economists get it, they are just not convinced that the existing system can work under a capped monetary policy. It is really the problem of understanding. What Bitcoiners are really advocating is a whole new system.

Today, modern monetary theory (MMT) has taken hold of the progressive movement as it also centers the idea of ​​a full employment guarantee where the government supports private sector employment with uncompetitive jobs. Supporters of MMT also believe they can control the money supply and inflation through fiscal and monetary policy. They argue that by bringing all the productive forces online (no more, no less), inflation can be properly managed. However, it has never been tried; the Federal Reserve Board does not practice real MMT at this time. To be clear, even supporters of MMT are critical of quantitative easing.

Nor does it mean that the left wholeheartedly approves of MMT. There is no shortage of criticism of MMT from the left, you just have to look for them. Even so, Bitcoin still appeals to a progressive, even if it is a supporter of MMT, simply because of concerns about the quality of its money over time. All you really need to do is explain to progressives how inflation decoupled from living wage adjustments is a silent killer of their wages. What is the alternative? Save some of that purchasing power in the long run by “houdling” bitcoin, of course.

Progressives are well aware of the damage caused by the Federal Reserve and the government during the Great Recession. Progressives supported Occupy Wall Street because many of them lost their homes to illegal foreclosures. Progressives must, however, be reminded that the ivory towers of central banks are no more our friends than are the mega-banks. We can do better to educate our progressive colleagues about money as technology and the idea that we can have a different economic system where a $ 21 million cap works.

To stimulate this idea of ​​a different economic system, let’s pull out of the degrowth movement. Degrowth encompasses many ideas, but the main one is that our economic system must be linked to the capacity of our planet to sustain life. Considering the ease with which the banking system generates money (has anyone compared the S&P 500 chart to the graph of the hockey puck on CO2?) And the obvious trends that our gross domestic product has increased, our carbon emissions too, it just seems logical that we have a cap somewhere.

In the degrowth literature, there have been discussions about tying a currency to the amount of energy produced. Bitcoin’s network is supported by access to energy resources. Its mining protocol is based on the price of electricity. It also has the ability to bring wasted and stranded energy online. This means that the network grows with a speed limit. We can plan entire savings around this prospect.

In addition, Bitcoin disintermediates the banking system and puts banking operations not only in the hands of the individual but also of the communities (which Occupy Wall Street advocated). Communities and / or cooperatives (as in the Autonomous People’s Economy of Rojava) can issue their own community guaranteed loans using bitcoin as a medium. There is a lot to explore here and progressives (and leftists more broadly) can really lead the way.

The reality is not that Bitcoin has to be rebranded to fit a progressive narrative. It is that Bitcoiners – and non-Bitcoiners – must realize that while the network’s genesis block was a political attack on the central banking system, this sentiment is not exclusive to American libertarianism. This is why progressives are in the Bitcoin space, because we know that Bitcoin is for everyone, and we’re going to make sure everyone, not just libertarians, knows that there is a way out of the system. and that Bitcoin can help us find the exit.

This is a guest article by Margot Paez. The opinions expressed are entirely their own and do not necessarily reflect those of BTC, Inc. or Bitcoin Magazine.

The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.


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Libertarians must be re-registered, nominate candidates in Maine https://freedomtoons.org/libertarians-must-be-re-registered-nominate-candidates-in-maine/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 22:07:28 +0000 https://freedomtoons.org/libertarians-must-be-re-registered-nominate-candidates-in-maine/ BANGOR – A federal judge has ordered election officials in Maine to allow members of the Libertarian Party to re-register in a fast-track process and nominate candidates for the 2022 election. Judge Lance Walker’s order, signed Dec. 31, requires Secretary of State Shenna Bellows to send letters advising Libertarians that their deregistration was illegal and […]]]>

BANGOR – A federal judge has ordered election officials in Maine to allow members of the Libertarian Party to re-register in a fast-track process and nominate candidates for the 2022 election.

Judge Lance Walker’s order, signed Dec. 31, requires Secretary of State Shenna Bellows to send letters advising Libertarians that their deregistration was illegal and that they can reinstate.

The judge also ruled that due to tight timetables, Libertarians can nominate candidates under the party banner for the 2022 election, whether or not their numbers meet the minimum threshold under state law. The decision was first reported by the Bangor Daily News.

Libertarians qualified for party status in July 2016 by registering more than 5,000 members. But it did not meet the state law requirement of at least 10,000 members voting in the next election.

One lawsuit argues that the state effectively rejected more than 6,000 voter registrations when it deregistered libertarians without their permission. That left only 105 registered libertarian voters.


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How did the United States become so divided? https://freedomtoons.org/how-did-the-united-states-become-so-divided/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 23:40:21 +0000 https://freedomtoons.org/how-did-the-united-states-become-so-divided/ OPINION: 2021 is behind us. It has been another year of conflict. Another year of anger. Another year of division. A year of the vaccinated against the unvaccinated, of the masked against the unmasked, of us against them. A time of racists calling everyone racists, men calling themselves women and basically everyone accusing everyone of […]]]>

OPINION:

2021 is behind us. It has been another year of conflict. Another year of anger. Another year of division. A year of the vaccinated against the unvaccinated, of the masked against the unmasked, of us against them. A time of racists calling everyone racists, men calling themselves women and basically everyone accusing everyone of being the cause of everything that afflicts us.

How did we get here? How did the United States become so divided?


Some argue that everything is political and that if we simply put aside our partisan differences all would be well, but such thinking is pious at best and naive in the extreme.

The problem is not that progressives disagree with conservatives, republicans with democrats, or independents with libertarians. No, political differences are not the cause of the disease. In fact, debating dissenting opinions is not at all the problem. As an educator, I have always believed that the compromise of a good argument is actually healthy.

The disease that plagues our culture is not disagreement, but rather the fact that we have completely abandoned all objective standards in deciding how to arbitrate our differences. The problem is not that we disagree, but rather that our nation no longer has any rational or peaceful means of deciding who is right and who is wrong. The problem is, we have let go of the truth.

In 1992, Rodney King brought our nation to reason for a brief moment when he uttered the now famous words: “Can’t we all get along?” For over 200 years, the answer was yes! Of course, we have had our struggles. And many were not negligible. But, for two centuries, we have debated, argued, protested and even fought our battles with obvious truths as the standard of cohesion. From generation to generation we have resolved to find a way to “get along”, and the way we did it was to trust the truth as a judge and to believe it, and it alone, would free us.

The Declaration of Independence tells us that such a truth is conferred on us by our creator and that it is not invented by the crowd. The truth is not the construction of a king, nor the product of public consensus. The truth is revealed from above, not made up from within. As St. Paul urges: “It is written in every human heart.

Since the founding of America, the inalienable rights that form the building blocks of our society have found their source in the revealed truth of God, not in government. The rejection of this fact – of this truth – goes hand in hand with the consequent loss of cultural unity and cohesion in our country. We dare not forget that John Adams once warned: “Our Constitution is made for one moral and religious people and is totally inadequate for the government of any other.

In other words, to live together in peace, Adams (along with all those who fought for us and gave us the freedoms we now enjoy) believed that we needed to have a bonding glue that comes from somewhere other than ourselves, of something bigger, better and wiser than you or me.

To pretend otherwise is sheer arrogance; chronological snobbery, to be more precise. It is like claiming that all reality can be explained from the test piece of ourselves. It is a credo of mere mortals who think they know more than the giants who came before them. A religion that cries out, “We are what we expected and we are the change we seek. A priesthood that believes its incantations can stem the ocean tide, calm the nation’s storms, and control the global climate. A Holy See that pompously claims to redefine biology and ignore genetics. This cult can cure illnesses with cloth masks and replace science with scientism. It is a faith that kneels in Dr Anthony Fauci as his pontiff with a “vaccine” as his Eucharist. It is a religion of pride and lies in opposition to one that humbly bows down to what is true.

This is the worldview that many Americans now share, and because of it, the sad answer to King’s question is, no, it seems we can’t all “get along.” Our new national religion is that of feelings about facts. It is a church of the created over the creator, of the self over the Savior, and of our power over the enduring principles of God.

History teaches us that the blood of liberty runs in the streets when the truth is beheaded on the guillotine of Jacobin arrogance. No culture has ever survived Robespierre’s elevation on the Apocalypse, of lying about what is real, just and true.

A return to true religion – a return to the truth – is the only thing that will save our nation and heal our land. We cannot all “get along” unless there is some standard other than ourselves that tells us how to do it.

• Washington Times columnist Everett Piper (dreverettpiper.com, @dreverettpiper) is a former college president and radio host. He is the author of “Not a Daycare: The Devastating Consequences of Abandoning Truth” (Regnery) and, more recently, of “Grow Up: Life Isn Safe, But It’s Good”.


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The history and politics of public radio https://freedomtoons.org/the-history-and-politics-of-public-radio/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 11:38:56 +0000 https://freedomtoons.org/the-history-and-politics-of-public-radio/ Public radio is much older than NPR. As early as the 1910s, universities were sending weather reports to farmers and, in the words of one historian, “esoteric jokes” to themselves. In the 1920s, as the New York City-owned WNYC was starting to operate, one of its founders argued that the government should establish large outlets […]]]>

Public radio is much older than NPR. As early as the 1910s, universities were sending weather reports to farmers and, in the words of one historian, “esoteric jokes” to themselves. In the 1920s, as the New York City-owned WNYC was starting to operate, one of its founders argued that the government should establish large outlets in every region while “cutting out the most expensive stations. poor and the weakest who broadcast inferior programs ”.

Drawing on both original research and previous studies (including — full disclosure — my own work), James T. Bennett’s The history and politics of public radio reviews these two types of noncommercial dissemination, one disjointed and bottom-up, the other centralist and elitist, with an eye on the subsidies and regulations that have spurred the centralist tradition. It covers struggles for funding (which don’t always follow the expected left / right lines), political manipulations (Washington funds often come with strings from Washington) and historical ironies (jazz has become a staple of the world. NPR, but advocates of the New Deal era broadcast “absolutely hated Jazz”).

The book does not deride the idea of ​​non-commercial radio. Instead, Bennett’s libertarian critique argues that non-commercial radio can be detached from the state – in fact, it’s better that way.


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OPINION: A struggle within the conservative family for rights https://freedomtoons.org/opinion-a-struggle-within-the-conservative-family-for-rights/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 22:30:25 +0000 https://freedomtoons.org/opinion-a-struggle-within-the-conservative-family-for-rights/ Breadcrumb Links Politics Opinion News national Local news Chroniclers Michael Kennedy, a libertarian homosexual, is suing the Justice Center for Constitutional Freedoms for violating his own vision and values. Author of the article: Daphne Bramham Release date : Dec 29 2021 • 15 minutes ago • 4 minutes to read • Join the conversation Stock […]]]>

Michael Kennedy, a libertarian homosexual, is suing the Justice Center for Constitutional Freedoms for violating his own vision and values.

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Michael Kennedy was 22, an idealistic, gay libertarian when he went to work for the newly established Constitutional Freedoms Justice Center.

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Now he’s suing the center in a new case, arguing that when an employer does something contrary to an organization’s mission and values, it breaks its contract with employees and amounts to constructive dismissal.

The Justice Center denies Kennedy’s claims in the lawsuit he filed in the Alberta Court of Queen’s Bench in September.

This is an unprecedented case in Canada, according to his lawyer Kathryn Marshall. This is largely because, unlike the United States, there are few think tanks, advocacy groups, and other organizations with an ideological mission.

In fact, it was this rarity that drew Kennedy to the Justice Center in 2011 during his training.

He had just completed an internship in the Koch Associates program and a part-time contract with the Foundation for Individual Rights and Education in Washington, DC “Protecting Free Speech on College Campuses.”

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“I fell in love with this job and wanted the Justice Center to do the same job,” he said. “That’s what my vision was and, in the beginning (at the Justice Center in Calgary), it was our favorite problem.

Kennedy’s sexual orientation was no secret.

JCCF founder and president John Carpay asked him about this before he hired him.

“I was offended to be asked. I had had a taste of the homophobia of the conservative movements… but I was disappointed that it was brought up as part of a job application, ”Kennedy said. “But I had just graduated from college and was desperately looking for a job.”

Even though in 2011 the Justice Center had already taken on a case widely seen as anti-LGBTQ, Kennedy said his philosophy was aligned with his view of individual rights taking precedence over collective rights.

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She intervened that year before the Supreme Court of Canada, defending Bill Whatcott’s right to distribute anti-gay pamphlets. The court disagreed, upheld the court ban and called it hate speech.

Four years later he lost again in the Supreme Court when he argued that Trinity Western University should not be denied law school, even though students are required to pledge to refrain. of sex outside of heterosexual marriages.

Speaking at a Rebel Media event in November 2018, Carpay said the way to defeat totalitarianism was to think about common characteristics: “It doesn’t matter if it’s a hammer and a sickle for communism or it is the swastika for Nazi Germany or a rainbow flag. The underlying thing is hostility to individual freedoms.

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It was a disaster for public relations. Kennedy said as director of communications he had nothing to do with it. Yet Carpay asked him to resign.

By September 2019, Kennedy had had enough. He resigned after the JCCF decided to represent the Buffone family at the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario, who believe their daughter was discriminated against on the basis of sex, gender and gender identity. Explaining gender fluidity in the classroom, a teacher reportedly said there were no boys and girls.

According to Kennedy’s statement, it wasn’t just that he was directly involved in the kind of tribunal that Carpay had previously called “kangaroo courts.”

This was also the argument of the JCCF.

Kennedy’s claim indicates that when he expressed his concern about it, it fuels “a growing public perception that the mission of the Charter-based Justice Center is a facade to justify attacking the LGBTQ community. Carpay justified the case by saying that it is “a (maybe ‘the’) major problem of our time.

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Kennedy told me, “The day I found out (JCCF taking the case), I had a stomach ache. I realized that I couldn’t work here anymore. … I don’t believe in mission.

JCCF’s defense offers a different point of view. When told he was taking the Buffone case, Kennedy replied, “Got it. I will stay there.

His statement of defense acknowledges that Kennedy had expressed his view that getting involved in the human rights complaints process was against his mandate.

But he said at no point had he suggested that if the JCCF continued its involvement in human rights processes, Kennedy would view it as a constructive dismissal.

This case is not only potentially a precedent in labor law. At the heart of it is the schism within the conservative / libertarian movement between those who believe that LGBTQ people are protected by freedom of expression, association and equality and those who believe these rights must protect. religious groups, organizations and others to speak out, speak and act on what they believe.

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Kennedy said it more clearly when we spoke.

Do libertarians and conservatives oppose asserting gender identity because no one should be forced to say things they don’t believe or because they don’t like transgender people?

And do they believe in freedom of speech as fundamental to protecting liberal democracy or because “they want to protect homophobes, racists and fanatics?

Since COVID-19, the Justice Center has focused less on LGBTQ fighting in favor of raising interesting constitutional questions while defending the right of individuals not to wear a mask or to be vaccinated.

But Carpay dealt a heavy blow to his organization last summer.

He admitted in July that he hired a private investigator to spy on Manitoba’s chief justice and health officials to see if they violated the province’s COVID restrictions. He took a leave of absence.

Carpay was back in September to try to restore confidence in the brand when Kennedy filed his lawsuit and claimed $ 470,800.

This case will not facilitate renewal.

dbramham@postmedia.com

Twitter: @bramham_daphne

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